Home‎ > ‎Math Essentials 10‎ > ‎

Math 10e Assignments

Graphing

posted Jun 16, 2010, 10:42 AM by Jon Hamlin

Mean Median & Mode


Mean, Mode, Median, Range


Mean, Median, Mode
 
 

     Mean:

                      -- Also known as the average.  The mean is found by adding up all of the given data and
             dividing by the number of data entries.

                Example:
                             - the grade 10 math class recently had a mathematics test and the grades were as
                               follows:
 

                                       78
                                       66
                                       82                                  464 / 6 = 77.3
                                       89
                                       75                        Hence, 77.3 is the mean average of the class.
                                    + 74
                                      464

     Median:

                      -- The median is the middle number.  First you arrange the numbers in order from lowest
                to highest, then you find the middle number by crossing off the numbers until you reach the
                middle.

              Example:
                               - use the above data to find the median:

                                                66  74  75  78  82  89\

                            - as you can see we have two numbers, there is no middle number.  What do we do?
                   It is simple; we take the two middle numbers and find the average, ( or mean ).

                                                             75 + 78 = 153

                                                              153 / 2 = 76.5

                             Hence, the middle number is 76.5.
 

         Mode:

                        -- this is the number that occurs most often.

                 Example:
                                 - find the mode of the following data:
 

                                    78  56  68  92  84  76  74  56  68  66  78  72  66
                                    65  53  61  62  78  84  61  90  87  77  62  88  81

                                                   The mode is  78.



Mean and Scatterplot Graph


Scatterplot & Trends


Pie Charts Made Easy!


Creating a Pie Chart with a Protractor


Trigonometry

posted Jun 14, 2010, 11:46 PM by Jon Hamlin   [ updated Jun 15, 2010, 10:14 AM ]


You will need a Scientific Calculator for these equations. You will need to bring one to your exam. Calculators will not be provided for you. If you have an Ipod Touch or Iphone - search for TouchCalc in the App Store - it is free!

News Flash - You can also access a scientific calculator without downloading anything on your Ipod or Ipone - just flip the screen sideways and it will change!





You can also find this type of calculator online for free but of course this won't work during your exam.


YouTube Video



YouTube Video

YouTube Video



YouTube Video


YouTube Video


YouTube Video




YouTube Video

YouTube Video



Final Exam Preparation

posted Jun 14, 2010, 11:29 AM by Jon Hamlin

Here is a Sample Final Exam for you to try

You can also view actual final exams from previous years by clicking here.
Select your grade and your language and you can view exams from last year and years before.


Here is the Math 10 E exam from 2008 / 2009       Here is the Answer Key

Here is the Math 10 E exam from 2007 / 2008       Here is the Answer Key


You can also try on-line practice tests by choosing the "E-Xam" link beside the answer keys.

Triangles

posted Jun 10, 2010, 1:11 PM by Jon Hamlin

YouTube Video


YouTube Video


Excel Exercise 1

posted May 3, 2010, 9:49 PM by Jon Hamlin

Hi Everyone,

I have uploaded this exercise on how to create a Gradebook using Microsoft Excel.

Please follow along with the instructions and input the information provided. Remember to save you work, we will be looking at your results on Wednesday.

Click here for the Excel Exercise 1

Using Spreadsheets

posted Apr 26, 2010, 8:36 AM by Jon Hamlin   [ updated Apr 26, 2010, 8:46 AM ]

We will begin by looking at these slide show presentations of various spreadsheets concepts.

Math 10 Essentials Ch 3


•  Section 3.1: The Basics Of Spreadsheets
•  Section 3.2: The Style File
•  Section 3.3: Smart Spreadsheets
•  Section 3.4: Starting From Scratch




Spreadsheets


•  Section 3.5: What If...?
•  Section 3.6: Saving Precious Time
•  Section 3.7: Handy Uses & Applications
•  Chapter 3 Review


Here is this great tutorial that breaks down exactly how to use the basics of Spreadsheets.


This second audio tutorial was created by Microsoft. It is really useful but you will need headphones or speakers to hear the lessons.


Assignment

Software:  Microsoft Excel

Goal:  To Create a computerized version of a worksheet showing projected expenses for a University students' fall term.  The design of the worksheet is based on this hand-drawn planning version.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)     The first step is to launch MS Excel or Open Office Calc and start a new worksheet.

2)     Next, type descriptive labels for the worksheet and TITLE, and label the rows and columns.  You may have to adjust the column widths in order to accommodate some of the longer and shorter headings.

3)     You should now also try to change the format of the cells to allow them to show the dollar sign figures (currency).  Try using the shortcut method (right click) when you have the desired cells selected.

4)     Now the data:

a)     Tuition and fees were a one-time fee which you paid in September ($1450)

b)    Books were also a one-time fee, also paid in September. ($450)

c)     Rent is a constant $250 a month, however you had to pay a $125 dollar damage deposit in your first month.

d)    Utilities are getting more expensive as the cold sets in. (Sept. $50, Oct. $60, Nov. $75, Dec. $95)

e)     Food is a constant $160 a month.

f)      Transportation is also a constant $120 a month.

g)     Odds and ends have been $100 a month for the first three, however this increases in December by $300 for your Christmas shopping.

 

5)     Once you have the data filled in, you need to calculate the totals for each month, as well as the totals for each row.

6)     Once the formulas are entered, and totals are complete, you should format the worksheet to make it much more attractive.  Change to suit your own tastes, however, keeping in mind that the worksheet will be read by others and should be readable. 

7)     You may send the worksheet to your instructor at this point, OR you may want to try the additional activity below.

 

 

 

Extra Activity : Creating Charts to accompany the worksheet.

1)     Using the worksheet from the previous section, create a chart depicting the data entered in a graphical form,

 

Some Guidelines:

a)     Highlight the data from the worksheet from which you wish to chart.

b)    From insert, choose chart.

c)     Choose a column chart

d)    The column chart often looks best when the months lay on the horizontal axis (bottom).  To do this choose "series: in rows"

e)     The chart should be placed on the same page as your worksheet.  Make sure the two do not overlap.

f)      Save the resulting document and email to your instructor as an attachment.


Rounding Numbers - review

posted Mar 22, 2010, 1:26 PM by Jon Hamlin

Rounding NumbersWhen rounding whole numbers there are 2 rules to remember:

I will use the term rounding digit - which means: When asked to round to the closest tens - your rounding digit is the second number to the left (ten's place) when working with whole numbers. When asked to round to the nearest hundred - the third place from the left is the rounding digit (hundreds place).

Rule 1. Determine what your rounding digit is and look to the right side of it. If the digit is 0,1,2,3 or 4 do not change the rounding digit. All digits that are on the right hand side of the requested rounding digit will become 0

Rule 2. Determine what your rounding digit is and look to the right of it. If the digit is 5,6,7, 8 or 9, your rounding digit rounds up by one number. All digits that are on the right hand side of the requested rounding digit will become 0

Rounding with decimals: When rounding numbers involving decimals, there are 2 rules to remember:

·        Rule 1. Determine what your rounding digit is and look to the right side of it. If that digit is 4,3, 2 or 1, simply drop all digits to the right of it.

·        Rule 2. Determine what your rounding digit is and look to the right side of it. If that digit is 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 add one to the rounding digit and drop all digits to the right of it.

·        Rule 3: Some teachers prefer this method:

This rule provides more accuracy and is sometimes referred to as the 'Banker's Rule'. When the first digit dropped is 5 and there are no digits following or the digits following are zeros, make the preceding digit even (i.e. round off to the nearest even digit). E.g., 2.315 and 2.325 are both 2.32 when rounded off to the nearest hundredth. Note: The rationale for the third rule is that approximately half of the time the number will be rounded up and the other half of the time it will be rounded down.

Examples:

765.3682 becomes:

1000 when asked to round to the nearest thousand (1000)

800 when asked to round to the nearest hundred (100)

770 when asked to round to the nearest ten (10)

765 when asked to round to the nearest one (1)

765.4 when asked to round to the nearest tenth (10th)

765.37 when asked to round to the nearest hundredth (100th.)

765.368 when asked to round to the nearest thousandth (1000th)


View these Rounding Numbers worksheets for more information



When finished, compare your answers with these!  How did you do?

Week 4

posted Feb 25, 2010, 1:40 PM by Jon Hamlin

Working with Timesheets

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Week 2

posted Feb 8, 2010, 1:32 PM by Jon Hamlin

This week we will be bringing together the data you collected last week and your new 'tax calculating' skills to complete your job outline, salary expectations, and monthly budget.

We will be working on this during Monday and Tuesday's class.

Here is an example of what your finished assignment should look like.

Untitled Post

posted Feb 8, 2010, 1:30 PM by Jon Hamlin

Job Description: A Plumber is responsible for installing, repairing and maintaining pipes, fixtures and other plumbing used for water distribution and waste water disposal in residential, commercial and industrial buildings.

 

Yearly Gross Income:  $75,000               ß before taxes

 

Tax Bracket: 35.39%      ß see Canadian tax brackets handout

 

Yearly Net income: $48,457.50   ß after taxes

 

 

Monthly Expenses

 

Rent:  $800

Entertainment: $200

Transportation: $400

Personal: $200

Utilities: $120

Savings: $100

Phone: $100

Food: $300

                                                                                                                        Total: $2220

 

Monthly Net Income:  $4028.13   ß yearly net income ÷ 12 months

 

-  Monthly Expenses  $2220

 

= $1808.13  leftover

 We will bring together the data we collected to create a finished job description, budget, and salary outline using the computer lab in A200.

Here is an example of what your finished assignment should resemble.

Job Description: A Plumber is responsible for installing, repairing and maintaining pipes, fixtures and other plumbing used for water distribution and waste water disposal in residential, commercial and industrial buildings.

 

Yearly Gross Income:  $75,000               ß before taxes

 

Tax Bracket: 35.39%      ß see Canadian tax brackets handout

 

Yearly Net income: $48,457.50   ß after taxes

 

 

Monthly Expenses

 

Rent:  $800

Entertainment: $200

Transportation: $400

Personal: $200

Utilities: $120

Savings: $100

Phone: $100

Food: $300

                                                                                                                        Total: $2220

 

Monthly Net Income:  $4028.13   ß yearly net income ÷ 12 months

 

-  Monthly Expenses  $2220

 

= $1808.13  leftover


1-10 of 11

Comments